A musical voyage, Taylor Wind Ensemble's journey through the spheres
Via Ad

A musical voyage

Taylor Wind Ensemble sure to be out of this world

 

The 45 member wind ensemble has practiced weeks for their upcoming concert. (Photograph provided by Unsplash)

The 45 member wind ensemble has practiced weeks for their upcoming concert. (Photograph provided by Unsplash)

By Abigail Roberts | Echo

This Wednesday, the 45-member Taylor University Wind Ensemble will fill the Rediger Auditorium with a whimsical mix of celebratory and cross-cultural music.

Their underlying theme is based on the hymn “This is My Father’s World,” with its key piece, arranged by Gary Gilroy, exploring the creation and the beauty that lies throughout the spheres.

“It seemed like a good theme to build a theme around,” said Al Harrison, professor of music.

The concert will include a wide variety of pieces. “The Canticle of Creatures,” a 13-minute long symphonic suite, is based on poems by St. Francis of Assisi and also explores themes of creation. With dissonant movements, some based off of a 12 tone scale, this piece explores the sun, moon, stars, fire and earth.

“It is some of the most challenging music we’ve played since I’ve been here,” said junior Joshua Morris, president of the Wind Ensemble. We perform as a culmination of (team) effort . . . (and) we all really work together to make this possible.”

Junior, Joshua Morris, president of the Wind Ensemble poses with his trombone. (Photograph provided by Joshua Morris)

Junior, Joshua Morris, president of the Wind Ensemble poses with his trombone. (Photograph provided by Joshua Morris)

Morris has been president of the Wind Ensemble for the last two years. Although not even a music major, Morris enjoys encouraging ideas of servant leadership and working with his fellow officers.

The band will also be playing “Hands Across the Sea,” a march by John Philip Sousa.

“I’m a band guy so I love marches,” said Harrison, a trombone player himself. Morris echoes this statement.

“I’m all about the Marches. There’s much more character in them (and) as trombone player you finally get the melody.”

Their multicultural element, “In a Persian Market,” is a jaunty piece. The artist Albert Ketèlbey is the first composer from the ’20s and ’30s to become a millionaire with his music. His piece takes the audience on a dazzling adventure through crowds of jugglers, fruit sellers, camel drivers, beggars and a snake charmer.

“We invite you to come and enjoy. (The concert) will be out of the ordinary with pieces from all around the world,” Morris said. Free and open to all, “Music of the Spheres” will take place Nov. 1 at 7:30 p.m..

Comments are closed.